Why I’ll never use Delicious again

I want to like Delicious, I really do. I’ve been using it to trap links of interest for a while now, and as someone who’s probably used 10 different computers regularly in the last few years, it seemed a handy way to store content I want to access again later, from anywhere. I installed the Delicious extension in Chrome recently and that made it easier and more likely that I’d share and tag links.

But my days with Delicious are over.

The social networks that have stood the test of time so far (“time” in Internet world meaning more than a year or two) have constantly added functionality, features and new design. Facebook does it every few months, it seems. Delicious, for whatever reason, never seemed to graduate into a really robust, useful platform for people to share and save content. It was hard (nearly impossible) to import and find friends, the interface was ugly and clumsy, and search was frustrating. It earned the moniker “Where links go to die” and that’s not too far from the truth, in my case.

It’s too late for Delicious. Google Reader has completely lapped it.

Google Reader started as a way to keep track of blog feeds, and I didn’t use it much beyond that. But then they began rolling out more useful features. You can tag and star items and organize feeds into folders. Then Google rolled out the “Share” function, which, with one click, allows you to post to your own public feed any item from your reader you wished. Google added the ability to find and follow friends via Google Reader and see, right from within your reader, what they are sharing. You can add notes and comments on items or send an item to someone via eMail. And let’s not forget the nifty ‘Trends’ stats feature (this is Google, after all) that shows you which feeds you’re most engaged with. (The official Google Reader blog is a great resource on all these features.)

For a long time, the only thing that kept me saving items to Delicious was the concept of “discovery.” Anything I wanted to save, share or tag in Google Reader was limited to feeds I was already subscribed to. If I happened across something on the Web or clicked to a link from Twitter, I didn’t have a good way to get it into my reader. Plus, I often found a single post interesting and bookmark-worthy, but had no desire to subscribe to the entire blog.

So, it was a two-party system for me: Google Reader to share and save the most interesting posts from among the feeds I already subscribed to, and Delicious for tagging and saving sites I randomly “found” out on the Web.

But it doesn’t have to be this way!

Google Reader has a “Note in Reader” bookmarklet! It does! And it has for two years! Drag the bookmarklet onto your browser’s toolbar, and wave goodbye to Delicious. The bookmarklet lets you save and/or share anything you find on the Web into your Google Reader. You can add notes and comments, just like you would on a blog post. I don’t know how I missed this feature, but to me, it pretty much means the end of Delicious.

The “Note in Reader” feature completes the content consumption round trip for me. Using Google Reader I can:

  • Subscribe to a blog or Web site’s feed to receive all its content
  • Arrange and sort feeds into folders and bundles
  • Star, tag, like, annotate and share specific items from those feeds to my own public “shared items” feed
  • Find and follow friends via my GMail contacts or other social networks, or even search for people via keyword or location, and then see and subscribe to items they are sharing
  • View recommendations for new feeds that Google generates by comparing my interests with feeds of users similar to me
  • Share and save content into my Google Reader from anywhere on the Web I happen to find it

I haven’t tinkered with Google Buzz much, but obviously Reader and Buzz are easily integrated so you can share items across that platform, too.

(I’m not even going to get started on Google Reader Play, which is possibly the biggest time suck I’ve ever seen – it curates and presents fun and interesting information from the Web it thinks I may like into a visual slideshow type of format and lets you share, like and save right from the screen. I’m talking hours lost here discovering fun stuff.)

So I’m sorry Delicious. I can’t even say that it was fun while it lasted, because it was always a bit cumbersome. It’s too bad we have to part ways, but with “Note in Reader” and all the other amazing options Google Reader offers, can you blame me?

Check out what I’m reading, saving and sharing via Google Reader here.

Why I’ve quit reading “social media blogs”

I’ve spent the last year and a half reading and learning as much about social media as possible, going from a complete n00b with barely a Facebook profile to a recovering social media addict. I ravenously consumed blog posts about PR, communications and social media. But after awhile, a lot of the information begins to feel repetitive (and derivative). I get it at this point – it’s “about the conversation” and “engaging with people” and “being transparent.”

My reading habits have changed over the last month or so. I’m no longer looking for basic social media information or more social media Kool-Aid and so I’ve purged my Google Reader of feeds I haven’t been getting much value from. I’m reading fewer and fewer personal or individual PR bloggers and instead gleaning more insight from collaborative blogs or blogs at major media outlets. My goal is less about the nuts-and-bolts or “how to” of social media and PR 2.0 and more about understanding the big picture — trends and successes in media, social networking, and the Web, and looking at how all of it impacts the way we will continue to consume news and information.

Some blogs will always have a revered spot in my reader, because I’m always finding value and new ideas from them. However, a lot of what I’m reading now isn’t even necessarily PR-focused. I’m always open to discovering a post on someone’s blog that showcases great thinking or a new idea, and I still stumble across some of those via Twitter. But I’m being more discerning about which feeds make it into my RSS reader.

Here’s what’s been recently added to my reader or what I’ve refocused on lately:

Media Industry and Trends

Hyperlocal News

Social Media and PR 2.0 in Practice

Business and Technology Insight

It’s a lot of content, which wreaks havoc on my previous system of organizing Google Reader. I’m much better now about scanning headlines, using the “sort by magic” feature to see the best posts, and not agonizing anymore about trying to get to everything.

What sites are you finding value in these days? Share in the comments.

This post is not about Oprah. Well, mostly not.

failwhale

…Beacuse I don’t really care about Oprah. Or Ashton. Or CNN. Twitter is going mainstream. The cool kids who were on it first are bent out of shape now. It’s like any trend – a small group starts it out, enough people notice so that it gets picked up and becomes mainstream, then the original trendsetters are suddenly upset that they’re no longer unique (see: “I liked Coldplay before they got all like, cool, and like, sold out and stuff.”)

I am not going to blog about Oprah adding Twitter to her Favorite Things and whether that’s good, bad or the end of the world. But lots of other communicators who I respect have weighed in, some very thougtfully.Some have their panties quite bunched about it, and some don’t really care. So for those of you who are interested, here’s a round up from my Google Reader as of 2:45 p.m. today:

From Ike Pigott at Media Bullseye:

“The Oprah Experiment”
Oprah built her empire of fans through traditional media channels. Most successful Twitter users built their networks organically. How will her network evolve? And will how will Twitter mine the user data that these power accounts create?

From Beth Harte at The Harte of Marketing:

“Let’s not forget celebs are marketers too”
Celebs make money. They can potentially use social media to make more money. Should they be exempt from the scrutiny that businesses face when dabbling in social media for marketing purposes?

From Ari B. Adler at Digital Pivot:

“Social Interaction Requires Being Social (and Interacting)”
Ashton and Oprah don’t get it. Twitter is a conversation, not a megaphone. It’s not about the numbers.

From Arik Hanson at Communications Conversations:

“It’s all about the numbers, right? RIGHT?
Social media is about numbers AND relationships. Number of followers has its place as a metric, but you have to build strong relationships, too.

From David at The Legends of Aerocles:

“@Oprah, Welcome to Twitter. Now please don’t break it. Why @Oprah and @aplusk don’t belong on Twitter”
Twitter is not for broadcasting. How can you possibly interact with 1 million followers? Why are you on Twitter if you’re not conversing?

From Lisa Barone at Outspoken Media:

“It’s not the recession, you just suck”
Stop talking about Oprah, dammit! Do something useful. Learn something. We’re wasting too much time on stuff that isn’t making us any money.

So there’s my Oprah/Ashton speedread. Let’s get on with our Fridays, shall we?